Awards recognise champion efforts against invasive species

Invasive Species Council CEO Andrew Cox (back) presents Froggatt Awards to (L-R) Cairns Post journalist Daniel Bateman, Wet Tropics Management Authority’s Lucy Karger, James Cook University’s Dr Lori Lach and Edmonton cane farmer Frank Teodo for their work on yellow crazy ants in the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. Photo: Jaana DIelenberg

Invasive Species Council CEO Andrew Cox (back) presents Froggatt Awards to (L-R) Cairns Post journalist Daniel Bateman, Wet Tropics Management Authority’s Lucy Karger, James Cook University’s Dr Lori Lach and Edmonton cane farmer Frank Teodo for their work on yellow crazy ants in the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. Photo: Jaana Dielenberg

Each year the Invasive Species Council recognizes people who have made a major contribution to protecting Australia from dangerous new invasive species with Froggat Awards.

The awards are named in honour of Australian entomologist Walter Froggatt.  When the cane toad was released into Australia in the 1930s to control beetle infestations in the sugar cane industry, Walter Froggatt was a lone voice, lobbying the federal government to exercise caution.

This year’s recipients includes federal water resources and agriculture minister Barnaby Joyce for his commitment to introducing mandatory biofouling regulations to protect Australia’s marine environment (and for keeping out Johnny Depp’s dogs).

Awards were also presented to those working on red imported fire ants in NSW and yellow crazy ants in Queensland as well as members of a Senate committee investigating environmental biosecurity.


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