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Global Category: about ISC

Pet cat containment a vital step to protect NSW’s wildlife

The Invasive Species Council and Nature Conservation Council have called on the NSW government to introduce clear laws to ensure pet cats are kept safe at home in order to save millions of native animals every year. The call comes in the wake of another 48 species added to the endangered species list.

Read More »

50,000 and more!

This year, we’ve been at the heart of one of the biggest issues for nature. By giving nature a voice, we’re making a difference together.

Read More »
Smooth newt caught in Melbourne waterway-Photo Ecology Australia

Eradication: Smooth newt

In 2013 Australia’s governments decided they would not attempt to eradicate recently-established smooth newts from Melbourne’s south-eastern waterways.

Read More »
A feral deer damaging land on private property in NSW.

Containment: Feral deer

Thanks to the help of our supporters the Invasive Species Council has enjoyed a strong track record of triggering political action on feral deer.

Read More »

Feral deer on the march in Tasmania

Tasmania’s Wilderness World Heritage Area is under threat from environmentally destructive feral deer. The Tasmanian Government knows deer are invading this global treasure, and must act.​

Read More »
Tim Low on Macquarie Island.

Our Story

The Invasive Species Council was founded by far sighted individuals sick of seeing wave after wave of weeds, feral animals and other pests destroying the natural places they loved.

Read More »
Superb fairy wren. Photo: Patrick Kavanagh

Leave a lasting legacy

Create a lasting environmental legacy by leaving a Gift in your Will to help us grow and keep Australia safe from the damage invasive species inflict on our incredible natural world.

Read More »
Feral Cat

What are invasive species?

Our Work Invasive species include pest animals like feral cats and foxes, introduced marine pests, weeds, diseases, fungi and parasites, as well as insects from

Read More »
Feral Cat

Who we are

Core to our work is protecting Australia’s natural environment from harmful invasive species through prevention and early action.

Read More »

Pet cat containment a vital step to protect NSW’s wildlife

The Invasive Species Council and Nature Conservation Council have called on the NSW government to introduce clear laws to ensure pet cats are kept safe at home in order to save millions of native animals every year. The call comes in the wake of another 48 species added to the endangered species list.

Read More »

50,000 and more!

This year, we’ve been at the heart of one of the biggest issues for nature. By giving nature a voice, we’re making a difference together.

Read More »
Smooth newt caught in Melbourne waterway-Photo Ecology Australia

Eradication: Smooth newt

In 2013 Australia’s governments decided they would not attempt to eradicate recently-established smooth newts from Melbourne’s south-eastern waterways.

Read More »
A feral deer damaging land on private property in NSW.

Containment: Feral deer

Thanks to the help of our supporters the Invasive Species Council has enjoyed a strong track record of triggering political action on feral deer.

Read More »

Feral deer on the march in Tasmania

Tasmania’s Wilderness World Heritage Area is under threat from environmentally destructive feral deer. The Tasmanian Government knows deer are invading this global treasure, and must act.​

Read More »
Tim Low on Macquarie Island.

Our Story

The Invasive Species Council was founded by far sighted individuals sick of seeing wave after wave of weeds, feral animals and other pests destroying the natural places they loved.

Read More »
Superb fairy wren. Photo: Patrick Kavanagh

Leave a lasting legacy

Create a lasting environmental legacy by leaving a Gift in your Will to help us grow and keep Australia safe from the damage invasive species inflict on our incredible natural world.

Read More »
Feral Cat

What are invasive species?

Our Work Invasive species include pest animals like feral cats and foxes, introduced marine pests, weeds, diseases, fungi and parasites, as well as insects from

Read More »
Feral Cat

Who we are

Core to our work is protecting Australia’s natural environment from harmful invasive species through prevention and early action.

Read More »

Pet cat containment a vital step to protect NSW’s wildlife

The Invasive Species Council and Nature Conservation Council have called on the NSW government to introduce clear laws to ensure pet cats are kept safe at home in order to save millions of native animals every year. The call comes in the wake of another 48 species added to the endangered species list.

Read More »

50,000 and more!

This year, we’ve been at the heart of one of the biggest issues for nature. By giving nature a voice, we’re making a difference together.

Read More »
Smooth newt caught in Melbourne waterway-Photo Ecology Australia

Eradication: Smooth newt

In 2013 Australia’s governments decided they would not attempt to eradicate recently-established smooth newts from Melbourne’s south-eastern waterways.

Read More »
A feral deer damaging land on private property in NSW.

Containment: Feral deer

Thanks to the help of our supporters the Invasive Species Council has enjoyed a strong track record of triggering political action on feral deer.

Read More »

Feral deer on the march in Tasmania

Tasmania’s Wilderness World Heritage Area is under threat from environmentally destructive feral deer. The Tasmanian Government knows deer are invading this global treasure, and must act.​

Read More »
Tim Low on Macquarie Island.

Our Story

The Invasive Species Council was founded by far sighted individuals sick of seeing wave after wave of weeds, feral animals and other pests destroying the natural places they loved.

Read More »
Superb fairy wren. Photo: Patrick Kavanagh

Leave a lasting legacy

Create a lasting environmental legacy by leaving a Gift in your Will to help us grow and keep Australia safe from the damage invasive species inflict on our incredible natural world.

Read More »
Feral Cat

What are invasive species?

Our Work Invasive species include pest animals like feral cats and foxes, introduced marine pests, weeds, diseases, fungi and parasites, as well as insects from

Read More »
Feral Cat

Who we are

Core to our work is protecting Australia’s natural environment from harmful invasive species through prevention and early action.

Read More »

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Feral Herald Archives

Dear Project Team,

[YOUR PERSONALISED MESSAGE WILL APPEAR HERE.] 

I support the amendment to the Kosciuszko National Park Wild Horse Heritage Management Plan to allow our incredible National Parks staff to use aerial shooting as one method to rapidly reduce feral horse numbers. I want to see feral horse numbers urgently reduced in order to save the national park and our native wildlife that live there.

The current approach is not solving the problem. Feral horse numbers have rapidly increased in Kosciuszko National Park to around 18,000, a 30% jump in just the past 2 years. With the population so high, thousands of feral horses need to be removed annually to reduce numbers and stop our National Park becoming a horse paddock. Aerial shooting, undertaken humanely and safely by professionals using standard protocols, is the only way this can happen.

The government’s own management plan for feral horses states that ‘if undertaken in accordance with best practice, aerial shooting can have the lowest negative animal welfare impacts of all lethal control methods’.

This humane and effective practice is already used across Australia to manage hundreds of thousands of feral animals like horses, deer, pigs, and goats.

Trapping and rehoming of feral horses has been used in Kosciuszko National Park for well over a decade but has consistently failed to reduce the population, has delayed meaningful action and is expensive. There are too many feral horses in the Alps and not enough demand for rehoming for it to be relied upon for the reduction of the population.

Fertility control as a management tool is only effective for a small, geographically isolated, and accessible population of feral horses where the management outcome sought is to maintain the population at its current size. It is not a viable option to reduce the large and growing feral horse population in the vast and rugged terrain of Kosciuszko National Park.

Feral horses are trashing and trampling our sensitive alpine ecosystems and streams, causing the decline and extinction of native animals. The federal government’s Threatened Species Scientific Committee has stated that feral horses ‘may be the crucial factor that causes final extinction’ for 12 alpine species.

I recognise the sad reality that urgent and humane measures are necessary to urgently remove the horses or they will destroy the Snowies and the native wildlife that call the mountains home. I support a healthy national park where native species like the Corroboree Frog and Mountain Pygmy Possum can thrive.

Kind regards,
[Your name]
[Your email address]
[Your postcode]


Dear Project Team,

[YOUR PERSONALISED MESSAGE WILL APPEAR HERE.] 

I support the amendment to the Kosciuszko National Park Wild Horse Heritage Management Plan to allow our incredible National Parks staff to use aerial shooting as one method to rapidly reduce feral horse numbers. I want to see feral horse numbers urgently reduced in order to save the national park and our native wildlife that live there.

The current approach is not solving the problem. Feral horse numbers have rapidly increased in Kosciuszko National Park to around 18,000, a 30% jump in just the past 2 years. With the population so high, thousands of feral horses need to be removed annually to reduce numbers and stop our National Park becoming a horse paddock. Aerial shooting, undertaken humanely and safely by professionals using standard protocols, is the only way this can happen.

The government’s own management plan for feral horses states that ‘if undertaken in accordance with best practice, aerial shooting can have the lowest negative animal welfare impacts of all lethal control methods’.

This humane and effective practice is already used across Australia to manage hundreds of thousands of feral animals like horses, deer, pigs, and goats.

Trapping and rehoming of feral horses has been used in Kosciuszko National Park for well over a decade but has consistently failed to reduce the population, has delayed meaningful action and is expensive. There are too many feral horses in the Alps and not enough demand for rehoming for it to be relied upon for the reduction of the population.

Fertility control as a management tool is only effective for a small, geographically isolated, and accessible population of feral horses where the management outcome sought is to maintain the population at its current size. It is not a viable option to reduce the large and growing feral horse population in the vast and rugged terrain of Kosciuszko National Park.

Feral horses are trashing and trampling our sensitive alpine ecosystems and streams, causing the decline and extinction of native animals. The federal government’s Threatened Species Scientific Committee has stated that feral horses ‘may be the crucial factor that causes final extinction’ for 12 alpine species.

I recognise the sad reality that urgent and humane measures are necessary to urgently remove the horses or they will destroy the Snowies and the native wildlife that call the mountains home. I support a healthy national park where native species like the Corroboree Frog and Mountain Pygmy Possum can thrive.

Kind regards,
[Your name]
[Your email address]
[Your postcode]