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BECOME A FIRE ANT FIGHTER

Join thousands of Australians turning the tide against invasive fire ants!

How to help Take action  |  Fire Ant Fighters

Australia can’t afford to lose the fire ant fight.

A future with wall-to-wall fire ants across the continent would devastate our national parks, turn bustling native bushland silent and change the way of life of every Australian. 

We’d have to spend billions across the country each year on intensive baiting programs to keep our greenspaces, gardens and homes habitable. We’d lose picnics and campsites. We’d lose wildlife and livestock. We’d lose people.

But fire ants are also a threat we can all do something about.

Fire ants have recently breached the infestation in South East Queensland, reaching Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island) and spreading to within 12km of the NSW border for the first time – the result of people moving fire ants in pot plants, soil and mulch! Both could have been prevented if more people in our communities knew what’s at stake if we fail to stop fire ants.

One of our biggest challenges is building awareness across Australia. 

That’s why we’ve developed a free info pack that you can use to raise awareness among your friends, family, networks and community. After signing up to be a Fire Ant Fighter, you will immediately receive the info pack full of resources you can use to learn more about Australia’s fire ants problem and how to raise awareness about it. You’ll also be kept in the loop about what’s going on behind the scenes via occasional email updates.  

The Fire Ant Fighter pack includes:

  • Posters for you to use and put up in high traffic areas.
  • Photos and videos showing fire ants in action.
  • Social media tiles.
  • Identification & reporting guides.
  • A ‘How to talk about fire ants’ primer and a detailed fire ant fact sheet to help you learn more about Australia’s fire ant problem and raise awareness about fire ants with your friends, family and networks.
  • Organisations can also access resources and support from our dedicated fire ant campaigner to conduct small group information sessions and raise broader awareness. Tick the organisation sign up box for further information.

Help turn the tide by becoming a fire ant fighter today!

Australia can’t afford to lose the fire ant fight.

A future with wall-to-wall fire ants across the continent would devastate our national parks, turn bustling native bushland silent and change the way of life of every Australian. 

We’d have to spend billions across the country each year on intensive baiting programs to keep our greenspaces, gardens and homes habitable. We’d lose picnics and campsites. We’d lose wildlife and livestock. We’d lose people.

But fire ants are also a threat we can all do something about.

JOIN THE FIRE ANT FIGHTERS

So far 1,827 Australians have already joined the fight against invasive fire ants. Let's make it 10,000!

After submitting this form, you will automatically receive a pack of information and resources to help you join the fight against fire ants. This includes guides you can use and share to assist with identifying and reporting invasive fire ants. You will also receive occasional campaign updates from the Invasive Species Council, you can unsubscribe at any time. 

What are fire ants?

Red imported fire ants (a.k.a. fire ants) are an invasive species that pose an enormous threat to the Australian environment and way of life. 

When fire ant nests are disturbed, or they identify new prey, they can rise up in their thousands to swarm and sting their target en masse. These swarms can kill small native animals, young livestock and pets. In the most extreme cases, their stings have even triggered fatal anaphylactic shock in people.

The fire and fight isn’t one Australia can afford to lose. The infestation around Brisbane remains the biggest and most difficult, but all it takes is someone relocating an infested pot plant for fire ants to suddenly pop up in your neighbourhood. 

If fire ants establish in your area, they could devastate national parks, turn bustling native bushland silent and change your way of life forever.

The only way of stopping fire ants is to build awareness of what’s at stake and generate support for eradicating fire ants once and for all. That’s only going to happen if enough Australians join the fight against fire ants!

Identify and report fire ants

Our Insect Watch profile details how to identify and report fire ants no matter where you are in Australia, including similar species that may be confused with fire ants. 

Read more about red imported fire ants

These highly invasive ants first turned up in Australia at the northern port of Brisbane in 2001. If we fail to get on top of the current outbreak in Queensland, modelling shows fire ants will spread to every corner of Australia.

Dear Project Team,

[YOUR PERSONALISED MESSAGE WILL APPEAR HERE.] 

I support the amendment to the Kosciuszko National Park Wild Horse Heritage Management Plan to allow our incredible National Parks staff to use aerial shooting as one method to rapidly reduce feral horse numbers. I want to see feral horse numbers urgently reduced in order to save the national park and our native wildlife that live there.

The current approach is not solving the problem. Feral horse numbers have rapidly increased in Kosciuszko National Park to around 18,000, a 30% jump in just the past 2 years. With the population so high, thousands of feral horses need to be removed annually to reduce numbers and stop our National Park becoming a horse paddock. Aerial shooting, undertaken humanely and safely by professionals using standard protocols, is the only way this can happen.

The government’s own management plan for feral horses states that ‘if undertaken in accordance with best practice, aerial shooting can have the lowest negative animal welfare impacts of all lethal control methods’.

This humane and effective practice is already used across Australia to manage hundreds of thousands of feral animals like horses, deer, pigs, and goats.

Trapping and rehoming of feral horses has been used in Kosciuszko National Park for well over a decade but has consistently failed to reduce the population, has delayed meaningful action and is expensive. There are too many feral horses in the Alps and not enough demand for rehoming for it to be relied upon for the reduction of the population.

Fertility control as a management tool is only effective for a small, geographically isolated, and accessible population of feral horses where the management outcome sought is to maintain the population at its current size. It is not a viable option to reduce the large and growing feral horse population in the vast and rugged terrain of Kosciuszko National Park.

Feral horses are trashing and trampling our sensitive alpine ecosystems and streams, causing the decline and extinction of native animals. The federal government’s Threatened Species Scientific Committee has stated that feral horses ‘may be the crucial factor that causes final extinction’ for 12 alpine species.

I recognise the sad reality that urgent and humane measures are necessary to urgently remove the horses or they will destroy the Snowies and the native wildlife that call the mountains home. I support a healthy national park where native species like the Corroboree Frog and Mountain Pygmy Possum can thrive.

Kind regards,
[Your name]
[Your email address]
[Your postcode]


Dear Project Team,

[YOUR PERSONALISED MESSAGE WILL APPEAR HERE.] 

I support the amendment to the Kosciuszko National Park Wild Horse Heritage Management Plan to allow our incredible National Parks staff to use aerial shooting as one method to rapidly reduce feral horse numbers. I want to see feral horse numbers urgently reduced in order to save the national park and our native wildlife that live there.

The current approach is not solving the problem. Feral horse numbers have rapidly increased in Kosciuszko National Park to around 18,000, a 30% jump in just the past 2 years. With the population so high, thousands of feral horses need to be removed annually to reduce numbers and stop our National Park becoming a horse paddock. Aerial shooting, undertaken humanely and safely by professionals using standard protocols, is the only way this can happen.

The government’s own management plan for feral horses states that ‘if undertaken in accordance with best practice, aerial shooting can have the lowest negative animal welfare impacts of all lethal control methods’.

This humane and effective practice is already used across Australia to manage hundreds of thousands of feral animals like horses, deer, pigs, and goats.

Trapping and rehoming of feral horses has been used in Kosciuszko National Park for well over a decade but has consistently failed to reduce the population, has delayed meaningful action and is expensive. There are too many feral horses in the Alps and not enough demand for rehoming for it to be relied upon for the reduction of the population.

Fertility control as a management tool is only effective for a small, geographically isolated, and accessible population of feral horses where the management outcome sought is to maintain the population at its current size. It is not a viable option to reduce the large and growing feral horse population in the vast and rugged terrain of Kosciuszko National Park.

Feral horses are trashing and trampling our sensitive alpine ecosystems and streams, causing the decline and extinction of native animals. The federal government’s Threatened Species Scientific Committee has stated that feral horses ‘may be the crucial factor that causes final extinction’ for 12 alpine species.

I recognise the sad reality that urgent and humane measures are necessary to urgently remove the horses or they will destroy the Snowies and the native wildlife that call the mountains home. I support a healthy national park where native species like the Corroboree Frog and Mountain Pygmy Possum can thrive.

Kind regards,
[Your name]
[Your email address]
[Your postcode]