National feral cat management survey – now open

The science is clear that feral cats are taking a significant toll on our native wildlife, with millions of native animals killed every day. That’s why in 2015 the Australian Government launched the Threatened Species Strategy led by the Threatened Species Commissioner.

The strategy includes ambitious targets to tackle the threat of feral cats including targeting 12 million hectares of best practice cat management and 2 million feral cats culled nationally by 2020.

Now, Threatened Species Commissioner Dr Sally Box is asking for your help.

“The Australian Government has enlisted the support of RMIT University to assess the national effort managing feral cats and we need Australians from across the nation to help us understand the role that the community is playing,” she says.

“We know that farmers, recreational shooters and Indigenous rangers are just some of the groups tackling this threat and I want to be able to recognise the community’s contributions at the national level.”

Take the survey

You can get involved by completing a short survey, which will provide critical information to build an understanding of the national effort:


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One Response to “National feral cat management survey – now open”

  1. AMRRIC is a not for profit organisation that works with remote and rural Indigenous communities nationally. AMRRIC facilitates vet and education programs for companion animals.
    Horrifically in the last 18 months we are constantly receiving comments from vets working remotely and residents of communities stating typically, as in this comment this morning: “Cats are everywhere….they have gone nuts in numbers lately.”
    It would seem that cats are becoming increasingly popular as pets with residents in remote communities (possibly as the dog populations become more managed) and cat owners in these communities are getting caught out by the incomparable efficiency of cats as breeders, so it is not uncommon to have 20 plus cats in one household.
    Consequently the increasing potential for spillover of cats into the surrounding environments whether it be desert regions or Top End wetlands is worthy of acknowledgement and discussion preferably sooner than later.