Climate change and invasive species

Climate change is expected to cause extinctions when native plants and animals are prevented from migrating out of their hotter or drier habitats to more suitable climates. But for many species a more imminent or serious threat will be the opportunities created by climate change for invasive species to proliferate and cause more harm.

Invasive species have already caused many extinctions and are one of the major causes of decline of native species and ecosystem degradation. The 2009 assessment of the vulnerability of Australia’s biodiversity to climate change noted that in many cases the impacts of invasive species benefiting from climate change are likely to exceed the direct impacts of climate change.

Download >>

Related posts

Submission to Discussion paper on tax-deductible gift recipient reform opportunities
Submission to draft Queensland Biosecurity Strategy 2017-22
red fire ant
Seven essentials: fire ant eradication program recommendations
Submission to draft national incursion prevention and response strategy for potentially invasive animals 2017-2022
Submission to draft Tasmanian Biosecurity Bill
Environmental Biosecurity: Best Practice A Guide for Australian Policy-makers
Environmental Biosecurity: Best Practice
Invasive species: A leading threat to Australia's wildlife
Submission to the Review of the National Environmental Biosecurity Response Agreement (NEBRA)
RIFA review report May 2016 cover page
Independent review of the national red imported fire ant eradication program - April 2016
Submission to the Review of the Intergovernmental Agreement on Biosecurity (IGAB) draft report