Category: risks-pathways

New biosecurity collective ready for action

With the number of pest and disease threats that could enter our country rapidly growing, last week biosecurity champions from across Australia and overseas came together to form Australia’s first biosecurity collective.

Risks and pathways: Invasive insects

Our Risks and Pathways Project set out to identify insect species from other countries that, if they ever reach Australia, have the potential to cause great harm to our natural environment. Australia is already home to more than enough invasive insects. Colonists like red imported fire ants, electric ants, browsing ants, yellow crazy ants, Argentine…

Cruise ships are one of several pathways by which new invasive species can reach Norfolk Island. Photo: Thomas Huxley | CC BY-ND 2.0

Norfolk Island rat baiting network and biosecurity project

In late 2016 the Invasive Species Council and Island Conservation, working with the local community, began a project on Norfolk Island to better control existing invasive pests and prevent the introduction of new potential pest species. The project had two objectives: Controlling rodents and ants The first was to help the Norfolk Island community protect…

Invasion watch profile: Social Hymenoptera

Risks and pathways project

Our Risks and Pathways Project set out to identify insect species from other countries that, if they ever reach Australia, have the potential to cause great harm to our natural environment. Australia is already home to more than enough invasive insects. Colonists like red imported fire ants, electric ants, browsing ants, yellow crazy ants, Argentine…

Imported roses and their many petals provide great hiding spots for invasive pests.

The ugly side of flowers

Just before Mother’s Day every year millions of flowers from across the world flood in to Australia. It is one of the most dangerous days on our calendar.

Protect Australia from Deadly Invasive Species

Strengthening environmental biosecurity – stopping new species arriving and establishing and limiting the harm caused by the worst invasive species – must be a priority of the highest order to save Australian species.