Category: risks-pathways

Cruise ships are one of several pathways by which new invasive species can reach Norfolk Island. Photo: Thomas Huxley | CC BY-ND 2.0

Norfolk Island rat baiting network and biosecurity project

In late 2016 the Invasive Species Council and Island Conservation, working with the local community, began a project on Norfolk Island to better control existing invasive pests and prevent the introduction of new potential pest species. The project had two objectives: Controlling rodents and ants The first was to help the Norfolk Island community protect…

Invasive species, pathway and site diagram.

Risks and pathways project

In January 2017 the Invasive Species Council and Monash University School of Biological Sciences, with support from the Ian Potter Foundation, began an environmental biosecurity risks and pathways project. The two-and-a-half-year project is to develop a national priority list of potential insect and plant disease invaders that could harm the natural environment, and identify their likely pathways of arrival…

Stealing into Australia: our new pests, year-by-year

As long as Australia has weak biosecurity laws dangerous new environmental invaders will continue to steal into our country. They come in many forms, as weedy garden species, hidden in cargo ships or even brought in and sold as ‘pets’. In the invasion timeline below we’ve listed new invasive species we know have been found…

Focus on national environmental biosecurity

The decision to create an office of environmental biosecurity protection is big step forward in protecting Australia’s environment from dangerous new invasive species.

Scrub myrtle (Rhodamnia rubsecens) has been so badly hit by myrtle rust since the disease reached Australia in 2010 that is was nominated for listing as critically endangered. Photo: Tim Low

Myrtle rust action plan

An action plan is being developed for myrtle rust, the plant-killing disease that poses a serious and urgent threat to Australia’s native plants and animals.

Submission to import risk analysis review – Sep 2014

A submission to the review of the import risk analysis process by the Department of Agriculture conducted between July and September 2014. The submission argues that a systematic risk-based approach be used to determine priorities for future import risk analyses and that the process could be improved through greater independence, better use of environmental expertise and the precautionary principle and an extended appeals process.