Category: preparedness

Join the biosecurity conversation in Australia!

The Gold Coast will be abuzz with all things biosecurity on 12-13 June 2019, when government, industry and other interested parties unite for the inaugural Australian Biosecurity Symposium.

Australia’s dirty dozen named and shamed

Our ‘dirty dozen’ is a list of some of the most dangerous overseas plants and animals to have evaded Australia’s environmental border controls.

Cruise ships are one of several pathways by which new invasive species can reach Norfolk Island. Photo: Thomas Huxley | CC BY-ND 2.0

Norfolk Island rat baiting network and biosecurity project

In late 2016 the Invasive Species Council and Island Conservation, working with the local community, began a project on Norfolk Island to better control existing invasive pests and prevent the introduction of new potential pest species. The project had two objectives: Controlling rodents and ants The first was to help the Norfolk Island community protect…

Case studies

Our case studies of dangerous invasive species that have made it into Australia or are likely to arrive illustrate the need for changes in how Australia prevents the establishment of new invasive species. The case studies are made up of our ‘dirty dozen’, 12 dangerous invasive species that have made it past Australia’s border controls…

Focus on national environmental biosecurity

The decision to create an office of environmental biosecurity protection is big step forward in protecting Australia’s environment from dangerous new invasive species.

Skin secretions produced by smooth newts could prove deadly to native birds in Melbourne’s suburbs. Photo: John Beniston (CC BY-SA 3.0)

NEBRA: Are our best defences only paper thin?

Our CEO Andrew Cox has been digging deep into Australia’s response mechanisms to dangerous new environmental invaders, and the results should rattle us all.

Hunt letter supporting EHA

Environment Health Australia

Environmental biosecurity – the protection of our natural environment from harmful exotic weeds, pests and diseases – requires much more attention than it currently receives.

Two government-industry bodies, Plant Health Australia and Animal Health Australia, have been working for many years to keep crop and livestock industries safe from new invasive species.

That is why we have launched ‘Keeping Nature Safe’, a proposal for the establishment of Environment Health Australia, a national body dedicated to environmental biosecurity. It would bring together major participants in environmental biosecurity, effectively involve the community sector, and foster collaboration in tackling some of Australia ’s most pressing and challenging environmental threats.

Environmental Health Australia would take up the challenge of keeping our incredible natural heritage, native plants and wildlife safe from new and emerging invasive species.

Invasive species – national priorities 2016

Seven national priorities for invasive species reform that deliver long-term cost savings, stem biodiversity losses and enhance agricultural productivity.