Category: law-policy

Media releases

Australia’s dirty dozen named and shamed

Our ‘dirty dozen’ is a list of some of the most dangerous overseas plants and animals to have evaded Australia’s environmental border controls.

Pages

Cruise ships are one of several pathways by which new invasive species can reach Norfolk Island. Photo: Thomas Huxley | CC BY-ND 2.0

Norfolk Island rat baiting network and biosecurity project

In late 2016 the Invasive Species Council and Island Conservation, working with the local community, began a project on Norfolk Island to better control existing invasive pests and prevent the introduction of new potential pest species. The project had two objectives: Controlling rodents and ants The first was to help the Norfolk Island community protect…

Case studies

Our case studies of dangerous invasive species that have made it into Australia or are likely to arrive illustrate the need for changes in how Australia prevents the establishment of new invasive species. The case studies are made up of our ‘dirty dozen’, 12 dangerous invasive species that have made it past Australia’s border controls…

Froggatt Awards

The Froggatt Awards are named in honour of Australian entomologist Walter Froggatt, who, when the cane toad was released into Australia in the 1930s to control beetle infestations in the sugar cane industry, was a lone voice, lobbying the federal government to exercise caution. At the time Walter wrote that ‘this great toad, immune from…

Feral Herald

Vote 1: Stop invasive species in Queensland

Along with land clearing, invasive species are the major threat to wildlife in Queensland. Yet biosecurity has been missing from Queensland election headlines.

Protect Australia

A campaign to fix the country’s leaky environmental borders and keep dangerous new environmental pests and diseases out. Send your message to the Deputy Prime Minister today.

Projects

Fact Sheets, Reports & Submissions

Norfolk Island – Protecting an Ocean Jewel

November 2017
With the Australian Government assuming responsibility for pre-border and border biosecurity there is now potential for Norfolk Island to be an exemplar in conservation-based island biosecurity.

Submission to Discussion paper on tax-deductible gift recipient reform opportunities

Submitted: August 2017
The work of the Invasive Species Council has been widely recognised by governments and the community and strongly opposes any requirement for DGR registered groups to undertake expenditure on environmental remediation. This proposed measure is extremely inefficient, illogical and disruptive and would have an extremely detrimental impact on our work.

Submission to draft Queensland Biosecurity Strategy 2017-22

Submitted: July 2017
A joint submission to the draft Queensland Biosecurity Strategy 2017-22 by the Invasive Species Council, Queensland Conservation Council and Wildlife Preservation Society of Queensland. The strategy is broadly endorsed but argues for a greater emphasis on environmental biosecurity and recognition of the limited capacity of the conservation sector.