Category: invasive-vertebrates

Media releases

Australia’s dirty dozen named and shamed

Our ‘dirty dozen’ is a list of some of the most dangerous overseas plants and animals to have evaded Australia’s environmental border controls.

Pages

Cruise ships are one of several pathways by which new invasive species can reach Norfolk Island. Photo: Thomas Huxley | CC BY-ND 2.0

Norfolk Island rat baiting network and biosecurity project

In late 2016 the Invasive Species Council and Island Conservation, working with the local community, began a project on Norfolk Island to better control existing invasive pests and prevent the introduction of new potential pest species. The project had two objectives: Controlling rodents and ants The first was to help the Norfolk Island community protect…

Case studies

Our case studies of dangerous invasive species that have made it into Australia or are likely to arrive illustrate the need for changes in how Australia prevents the establishment of new invasive species. The case studies are made up of our ‘dirty dozen’, 12 dangerous invasive species that have made it past Australia’s border controls…

Stealing into Australia: our new pests, year-by-year

As long as Australia has weak biosecurity laws dangerous new environmental invaders will continue to steal into our country. They come in many forms, as weedy garden species, hidden in cargo ships or even brought in and sold as ‘pets’. In the invasion timeline below we’ve listed new invasive species we know have been found…

Feral Herald

‘Brumbies Bill’ an attack on all we hold dear

The NSW Government decision to protect feral horses in Kosciuszko National Park at the expense of some of our most vulnerable native plants and animals flies in the face of science and common sense.

Projects

Fact Sheets, Reports & Submissions

Invasive species: A leading threat to Australia’s wildlife

February 2017
Habitat loss is often assumed to be the main threatening process in Australia. This compilation of evidence demonstrates that invasive species are the main threat facing Australias declining mammals and frogs and, along with habitat loss and potentially climate change, represents one of the three main threats to biodiversity.