Category: eradication

Yellow crazy ants

Yellow crazy ants are on the list of 100 of the world’s worst invasive species and threaten Queensland’s Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, the oldest continuously surviving tropical rainforests on Earth and home to the greatest biodiversity found anywhere in Australia. If not stopped in their tracks they could threaten Queensland with economic and ecological…

Our community coordinator Yvette Williams is keen for more volunteers to get involved in the Townsville Yellow Crazy Ant Community Taskforce.

Townsville Yellow Crazy Ant Community Taskforce

Highly aggressive yellow crazy ants are listed as one of the top 100 worst invasive species in the world, and sadly, have made it into northern Australia through our ports. Capable of forming super colonies, they threaten our Wet Tropics World Heritage Area and carry huge social, environmental and financial impacts. That’s why we’ve joined…

Case studies

Our case studies of dangerous invasive species that have made it into Australia or are likely to arrive illustrate the need for changes in how Australia prevents the establishment of new invasive species. The case studies are made up of our ‘dirty dozen’, 12 dangerous invasive species that have made it past Australia’s border controls…

Invasive species: Where the parties stand at the 2019 Australian election

Invasive species are one of the biggest drivers of environmental loss in Australia, and threaten our native animals and plants more than any other single factor. Analysis by 12 ecologists released earlier this year revealed the extent of the problem. Invasive species are driving more than 80 per cent of our threatened native species towards…

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Island conservation

Australia has more than 8300 islands, ranging in size from Tasmania to small rock stacks. These islands play a vital and unique role in the conservation of Australia’s native plants and animals. Many island species are found nowhere else. In some cases islands are the last refuge for species extinct on the Australian mainland. For…

Tropical fire ant workers measure between 1 and 5mm and attack any intruder that disturbs their nest. Photo: April Nobile, from www.AntWeb.org

Tropical fire ants

Probably introduced into Australia by early European settlers tropical fire ants are highly aggressive and attack any intruder who disturbs their nest.